What is the best gear ratio for cycling?

What gear ratios do professional cyclists use?

Pros often use a 55×11-tooth high gear for time trials. On flat or rolling stages they might have 53/39T chainrings with an 11-21T cassette. In moderate mountains they switch to a large cog of 23T or 25T. These days, they’ve joined the big-gear revolution like many recreational riders.

What is the best gear ratio for a fixed gear?

A gear ratio is determined by the number of teeth you have in the chain ring and the rear cog. We personally recommend riding a fixed gear or single speed bike with either 44 or 46 teeth in the chain ring (hence the first number in the gear ratio) and a rear cog with 16 teeth.

What gear should my bike be in when going uphill?

Low Gear = Easy = Good for Climbing: The “low” gear on your bike is the smallest chain ring in the front and the largest cog on your cassette (rear gears). In this position, the pedaling will be the easiest and you’ll be able to pedal uphill with the smallest amount of resistance.

What is the easiest gear on a bike?

Low Gear. The low gear is the “easy” gear and is primarily used when climbing. The low gear is the smallest chain ring in the front, and the largest cog on the rear cassette. In this position pedaling will be easiest and the least amount of force will be required to push the pedals.

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How do you choose a gear ratio?

To calculate the gear ratio:

Divide the number of driven gear teeth by the number of drive gear teeth. In our example, it’s 28/21 or 4 : 3. This gear ratio shows that the smaller driver gear must turn 1,3 times to get the larger driven gear to make one complete turn.

How does chainring size affect speed?

The size of a chainring (often expressed in terms of the amount of teeth on it, e.g. a 53t ring) plays a direct role in your bike’s gearing, with bigger rings meaning a higher (harder to push) gear and smaller rings a lower (easier to push) gear.

What is the max speed of fixed gearing?

I’m guessing I would top out somewhere around 40 mph with this gearing. Longest sustained speeds with the same gearing on a group ride, I’ve followed the group slowly accelerating from 24mph – 29mph over approximately 1.5 miles, then finished with a 33-34 mph sprint up a slight hill (our normal sign sprint) for approx.

How do I pick a fixie?

Since there’s only one gear on a fixie, choosing the best one is important. You’ll need to weigh how you like to pedal (how fast you pedal), where you enjoy riding (the hills or flats, or both), and have a feeling for how fit you are (stronger riders can handle higher gears and vice versa).