Question: Why are mountain bike handlebars so wide?

Are my MTB handlebars too wide?

If the bars paired with that stem are too wide, the steering will feel even slower, you will be bent over too much at the hips, and a strong riding position will be compromised. Narrower bars are used in this case to keep your chest open even when leaning forward in a climbing position.

How do I know what width handlebars to buy?

But what is the right handlebar width? The standard fitting advice is to get a handlebar as wide as the measurement between your AC joints. Those are the bumps atop your shoulders where the collarbone attaches just inboard of your deltoid muscle. But many riders prefer a handlebar slightly wider than their shoulders.

How do I know if my mountain bike is too big?

If your back, shoulders, or wrists ache after a ride, that could be a sign that your bicycle frame is too big. But don’t head straight for a smaller frame—especially if you don’t have those symptoms. A larger frame works better for some riding styles. A bigger frame allows for looser handling, which some people prefer.

Do wider bars increase reach?

As your handlebar length increases your reach decreases. A wider bar will shift more of your weight forward. … The general rule of thumb is to maintain a 2:1 ratio of handlebar width to stem length: for every 20mm increase in handlebar length you should reduce your stem length by 10mm.

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How do I know if my handlebars are too wide?

Notice the high elbows and shrugged shoulders? If you are most comfortable on your bars in this position, it’s quite possible they are too wide. Optimal shoulder mechanics will be present with a more externally rotated humerus (elbows down slightly).

Are all MTB stems the same?

Stems are available to fit a range of steerer tube sizes with 1 1/8” being by far the most common on both MTB and road bikes. However some models are also available for older bikes with 1” steerers (although a shim can also be used to make these fit standard stems) or for gravity bikes with 1.5” steerer tubes.